Post 8: My Support Network as told by a Doodle

I’ve always doodled a bit when taking notes, but was really excited when I saw sketch/doodle notes during #nctmannual from Jill Gough.

I’ve been using the resources at BrainDoodles to get me started.

My support network

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Post 5: Being Candid…

Our school is looking for a few new teachers for the following school year and I have been watching some demo lessons and have gotten a chance to speak to some of them. Everyone has asked at some point to share my experience working at the school and it seemed like a great prompt for a blog post.

  • There are high expectations: Thats usually the first thing out of my mouth. This is the first school that I have worked at, but from what I’ve been told by teachers who have worked at other schools, we are asked to do a lot more than at any other place they have worked at. For example, implementing cross content instructional tools, looking at student work protocols weekly, keeping in touch with parents, assisting special education teachers in completing IEPs by giving them current student info on academics/social emotional behavior. All of this can be really overwhelming sometimes.
  • With bullet mentioned above, it can get pretty intense in our building at various times of the year, but it’s okay (and very encouraged) to reach out for support.
  • We hold our students accountable because we believe we are stakeholders in their success and many of us do that on our own time. Our AP and principal have standing detention with the students during our extended day, but I usually opt to hold my students. It’s just more meaningful that way, especially because sometimes it’s “we need to make up work because you chose to not finish it in my class” detention and that is just silent work time detention, “you didn’t do the work because you were so lost and shut down and then started goofing off” detention and the looks more like one on one support, and other times it’s “you had a bad day, so let’s just talk and reflect” detention, and sometimes it’s not “detention”, but come hang out with me and “let’s build a relationship” kind of thing. This too can be very, very overwhelming.
  • We collaborate A LOT, we get a lot of feedback, we give a lot of feedback, we are up in everyone’s business and that’s great for us, but might not work for everyone. We have time built in our schedule for much of this collaboration to happen.
  • We use SBG and there tends to be a learning curve (3 years in and I’m still towards the beginning of that curve).
  • We really emphasize supporting diverse learning needs and in an ideal world would love to have every single class be in an ICT setting!
  • From knowing my colleagues, working with my admin–majority of the people are happy here.
  • I’m happy where I work and with whom I work. I feel really supported and consider the people I work with an extension of my family, who really understand what I go through every day.
  • I work with really smart and awesome people who make me reflect on my own teaching constantly and who remind me I can do better each day.